Reasons for Employee Resistance to Change

If you've ever worked in an environment where top brass assumed that they could impose changes on staff at will, and without rumors surfacing beforehand, you know just how clueless such leaders can be. It doesn't matter how tightly leaders try to keep a lid on sweeping changes because people always know when something is brewing. If leaders pretend that nobody knows what is afoot, then they won't communicate about proposed changes, and the rumors become progressively more outlandish. Then, when the change is finally put in place, the employees have already worked up a good bit of mistrust of the leadership. Employee motivation plummets.

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Resistance to Change is Proportional to the Size of Change

Generally speaking, in the workplace, resistance to change is proportional to the size of the change. If you've been offered a better vending deal by one soda vendor than by the current one, and starting next week the break room will have new machines instead of the current ones, there will definitely be grumbling. But it will mostly be just that: grumbling followed quickly by acceptance - particularly if you tell team members that it means soda prices won't go up for a year!

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